Escenarios Regionales

Reflecting on the world of today

Posts tagged Environment

27 notes &

globalvoices:

“[The law] wants to legalize the seeds policy that has had disastrous results in the U.S. and Europe. This law would give Monsanto the ownership of seeds. The seeds that our small farmers and landholders sow would just have to be contaminated by the gene to be considered the property of Monsanto, and seed producers would not be able to collect their seeds”Read: Argentina’s Impending ‘Monsanto Law’ is Not Welcome

globalvoices:

“[The law] wants to legalize the seeds policy that has had disastrous results in the U.S. and Europe. This law would give Monsanto the ownership of seeds. The seeds that our small farmers and landholders sow would just have to be contaminated by the gene to be considered the property of Monsanto, and seed producers would not be able to collect their seeds”

Read: Argentina’s Impending ‘Monsanto Law’ is Not Welcome

Filed under Argentina americas environment protests

0 notes &

Brazil soon expects to overtake the US as the world’s biggest soy producing nation. In the Amazon, soy farmers have rapidly expanded their land by using fire, bulldozers, saw mills and logging teams to clear the rainforest. But amid mounting concerns about global warming and biodiversity loss, Brazil’s government is deploying more personnel and equipment to hold the line between the food and the forest

(Source: Guardian)

Filed under brazil americas environment

15 notes &

Extreme Weather Means Extreme Food Prices Worldwide, Aid Agency Warns

Reducing greenhouse gases and saving the polar bears tend to dominate discussions on climate change. But to the booming world population, one climate change issue may be even more pressing – hunger.

A new report by a leading international relief agency warns that climate change will increase the risk of large spikes in global food prices in the future, and lead to more hungry people in the world. That’s because extreme weather like droughts, floods and heat waves are predicted to become much more frequent as the planet heats up.

"Our planet is boiling and if we don’t act now, hunger will increase for millions of people on our planet," says Heather Coleman, climate change policy adviser for Oxfam America, which released the report today.

Filed under global warming food prices environment

53 notes &

fotojournalismus:

Residents march against the Conga gold and silver mining project in Mamacocha Lagoon, Peru, Aug. 21, 2012. Demonstrators in Peru resumed their protests against plans to develop a $4.8 billion gold mine, saying they fear the mine will taint their water and affect a major aquifer. The mine is majority owned by U.S.-based Newmont Mining Corp.
[Credit : Martin Mejia / AP]

fotojournalismus:

Residents march against the Conga gold and silver mining project in Mamacocha Lagoon, Peru, Aug. 21, 2012. Demonstrators in Peru resumed their protests against plans to develop a $4.8 billion gold mine, saying they fear the mine will taint their water and affect a major aquifer. The mine is majority owned by U.S.-based Newmont Mining Corp.

[Credit : Martin Mejia / AP]

Filed under peru americas mining Environment protests

0 notes &

Brazil court orders Chevron to stop drilling - Americas - Al Jazeera English

A federal court has given Chevron and Transocean 30 days to suspend all petroleum drilling and transportation operations in Brazil until investigations are completed into two oil spills off the coast of Rio de Janeiro.

The court said in a statement posted on Wednesday on its website that each company will be fined 500 million reals, or about $244m, for each day they fail to comply with the suspension.

About 155,000 gallons of oil crude began seeping from cracks in the ocean floor at the site of a Chevron appraisal well in November. Chevron has placed the amount of oil that leaked at 110,000 gallons.

Two weeks later, the National Petroleum Agency said the seepage was under control. But in March, oil again started leaking and Chevron voluntarily suspended production in the field.

"Two environmental accidents in the space of just four months and the lack of equipment needed to identify the origin of the leaks and contain them, shows that the two companies do not have the conditions necessary to operate the wells in an environmentally safe manner," Judge Ricardo Perlingeiro said in his ruling.

Chevron said in an emailed statement it planned to appeal the court’s decision.

Filed under brazil americas oil industry Environment

2 notes &

Anti-nuclear campaigners launch Japan’s first green party
Greens Japan promises voters to put environment first and abolish nuclear power plants
Anti-nuclear campaigners in Japan have launched the country’s first green party, more than a year after the triple meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi power plant created a groundswell of opposition to atomic energy.
Greens Japan, created by local politicians and activists, hopes to satisfy the legal requirements to become an officially recognised political party in time for the general election, which must be held by next summer but could come much earlier.
The party said it would offer voters a viable alternative to the two main parties, both of which have retained their support for nuclear power, particularly after the recent decision to restart two nuclear reactors in western Japan.
The ruling Democratic party of Japan and the minority opposition Liberal democratic party [LDP] both supported the nuclear restart, which came after Japan was briefly left without nuclear power for the first time in more than 40 years.
Akira Miyabe, Greens Japan’s deputy leader, said voters had been deprived of the chance to support a party that puts nuclear abolition and other green policies at the top of its agenda. “We need a party that puts the environment first,” he said at a launch event in Tokyo.
The 1,000-member party is still a gathering of disparate groups and local politicians, but believes it can emulate green parties in Germany and other parts of Europe and influence the national debate over energy policy.
Nao Suguro, a co-leader of the party who sits on a local assembly in Tokyo, said the aim was “to create a broad network to accommodate calls for the abolition of nuclear power plants.”
The party will struggle to field any candidates if, as some predict, the prime minister, Yoshihiko Noda, calls a snap lower house election. But it said it was prepared to put up about 10 candidates in next summer’s upper house elections.
Pictured: Members of Greens Japan during their inaugural party meeting. The party wants to emulate other green parties of Europe and influence Japan’s energy policy. Photograph: Greens Japan

Anti-nuclear campaigners launch Japan’s first green party

Greens Japan promises voters to put environment first and abolish nuclear power plants

Anti-nuclear campaigners in Japan have launched the country’s first green party, more than a year after the triple meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi power plant created a groundswell of opposition to atomic energy.

Greens Japan, created by local politicians and activists, hopes to satisfy the legal requirements to become an officially recognised political party in time for the general election, which must be held by next summer but could come much earlier.

The party said it would offer voters a viable alternative to the two main parties, both of which have retained their support for nuclear power, particularly after the recent decision to restart two nuclear reactors in western Japan.

The ruling Democratic party of Japan and the minority opposition Liberal democratic party [LDP] both supported the nuclear restart, which came after Japan was briefly left without nuclear power for the first time in more than 40 years.

Akira Miyabe, Greens Japan’s deputy leader, said voters had been deprived of the chance to support a party that puts nuclear abolition and other green policies at the top of its agenda. “We need a party that puts the environment first,” he said at a launch event in Tokyo.

The 1,000-member party is still a gathering of disparate groups and local politicians, but believes it can emulate green parties in Germany and other parts of Europe and influence the national debate over energy policy.

Nao Suguro, a co-leader of the party who sits on a local assembly in Tokyo, said the aim was “to create a broad network to accommodate calls for the abolition of nuclear power plants.”

The party will struggle to field any candidates if, as some predict, the prime minister, Yoshihiko Noda, calls a snap lower house election. But it said it was prepared to put up about 10 candidates in next summer’s upper house elections.

Pictured: Members of Greens Japan during their inaugural party meeting. The party wants to emulate other green parties of Europe and influence Japan’s energy policy. Photograph: Greens Japan

Filed under japan asia Environment nuclear power politics

0 notes &

Brazil targets Amazon gold miners in Yanomami reserve
Brazilian police have carried out a big operation against illegal gold miners in the Amazon, arresting at least 26 people.
Gold, mining equipment and several aircraft used to take men and supplies into the remote region were seized.
Police said the miners were causing grave environmental damage in the Yanomami indigenous reserve, near Brazil’s border with Venezuela.
The Yanomami have long complained of miners invading their lands.
Five criminal groups involved in illegal gold mining were identified during a year-long investigation in Roraima state, the Federal Police said.
The miners were using powerful pumps mounted on barges to dredge material from the bottom of the river and blast the river banks.
The environmental impact was worsened by the use of highly-toxic mercury to separate gold from the river silt.
Among those arrested are pilots, engineers and businessmen accused of funding the mining operations and selling the gold in the city of Boa Vista.
"The focus of the operation was to target the economic motor of illegal mining, which is to say the financiers and the planes used to invade indigenous lands," police superintendent Alexandre Silva Saraiva told O Globo newspaper.
Around 20,000 Yanomami live in relative isolation in the indigenous reserve, which covers nearly 100,000 square km (38,610 square miles) of rainforest along the Venezuelan border.
The tribe has been resisting encroachment by gold miners for decades, accusing them of destroying the rainforest and introducing diseases.
In recent years the soaring price of gold on world markets has driven a surge in unlicensed gold-mining in many parts of the Amazon.
Pictured: The huge scale of the Amazon makes it hard for the authorities to control

Brazil targets Amazon gold miners in Yanomami reserve

Brazilian police have carried out a big operation against illegal gold miners in the Amazon, arresting at least 26 people.

Gold, mining equipment and several aircraft used to take men and supplies into the remote region were seized.

Police said the miners were causing grave environmental damage in the Yanomami indigenous reserve, near Brazil’s border with Venezuela.

The Yanomami have long complained of miners invading their lands.

Five criminal groups involved in illegal gold mining were identified during a year-long investigation in Roraima state, the Federal Police said.

The miners were using powerful pumps mounted on barges to dredge material from the bottom of the river and blast the river banks.

The environmental impact was worsened by the use of highly-toxic mercury to separate gold from the river silt.

Among those arrested are pilots, engineers and businessmen accused of funding the mining operations and selling the gold in the city of Boa Vista.

"The focus of the operation was to target the economic motor of illegal mining, which is to say the financiers and the planes used to invade indigenous lands," police superintendent Alexandre Silva Saraiva told O Globo newspaper.

Around 20,000 Yanomami live in relative isolation in the indigenous reserve, which covers nearly 100,000 square km (38,610 square miles) of rainforest along the Venezuelan border.

The tribe has been resisting encroachment by gold miners for decades, accusing them of destroying the rainforest and introducing diseases.

In recent years the soaring price of gold on world markets has driven a surge in unlicensed gold-mining in many parts of the Amazon.

Pictured: The huge scale of the Amazon makes it hard for the authorities to control

Filed under brazil americas Amazon Rain Forest mining Environment Indigenous Peoples

0 notes &

Chinese anti-pollution protesters freed as state bows to public outcry
A Chinese city has released 21 people who were detained after a clash between police and residents protesting against a metals plant they feared would poison them, city officials said on Wednesday.
Shifang government releases majority of demonstrators and cancels copper plant project after thousands took to streets
Thousands of people in the south-west city of Shifang took to the streets over the past three days to protest against the government’s plans to allow the building of a copper alloy plant, the latest unrest spurred by environmental concerns in the world’s second-largest economy.
The Shifang government said police had “forcibly taken away 27 suspected criminals” on Monday and Tuesday for tearing down the door of the municipal government building, smashing windows and throwing bricks and stones at police and government workers.
That prompted a massive sit-in on Tuesday night outside a government office by locals demanding their release.
Six are still in police custody, the city government said in a statement on its official Sina Weibo microblogging site.
"The remaining 21 people, after receiving criticism and education and repenting for their mistakes, were released at 11pm on 3 July," the government said on Wednesday.
The government took the uncommon step on Tuesday night of cancelling the metals project planned by Shanghai-listed Sichuan Hongda. The city initially had said it would only suspend the project.
The latest protest underscores how environmental worries have stoked calls for expanded rights for citizens and greater consultation in the tightly controlled one-party state. They follow similar demonstrations against projects in the cities of Dalian in the north-east and Haimen in southern Guangdong province in the past year.
Pictured: Protests in Shifang highlighted growing concerns over the environmental impact of industrial development. Photograph: Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese anti-pollution protesters freed as state bows to public outcry

A Chinese city has released 21 people who were detained after a clash between police and residents protesting against a metals plant they feared would poison them, city officials said on Wednesday.

Shifang government releases majority of demonstrators and cancels copper plant project after thousands took to streets

Thousands of people in the south-west city of Shifang took to the streets over the past three days to protest against the government’s plans to allow the building of a copper alloy plant, the latest unrest spurred by environmental concerns in the world’s second-largest economy.

The Shifang government said police had “forcibly taken away 27 suspected criminals” on Monday and Tuesday for tearing down the door of the municipal government building, smashing windows and throwing bricks and stones at police and government workers.

That prompted a massive sit-in on Tuesday night outside a government office by locals demanding their release.

Six are still in police custody, the city government said in a statement on its official Sina Weibo microblogging site.

"The remaining 21 people, after receiving criticism and education and repenting for their mistakes, were released at 11pm on 3 July," the government said on Wednesday.

The government took the uncommon step on Tuesday night of cancelling the metals project planned by Shanghai-listed Sichuan Hongda. The city initially had said it would only suspend the project.

The latest protest underscores how environmental worries have stoked calls for expanded rights for citizens and greater consultation in the tightly controlled one-party state. They follow similar demonstrations against projects in the cities of Dalian in the north-east and Haimen in southern Guangdong province in the past year.

Pictured: Protests in Shifang highlighted growing concerns over the environmental impact of industrial development. Photograph: Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

Filed under china asia mining protests Environment

1 note &

Japan, Norway and allies vote down South Atlantic whale sanctuary
An idea raised by several South American countries to create a haven for whales in the South Atlantic was shot down Monday at the International Whaling Commission.
Though little whaling takes place in the zone, the plan was rejected by Japan, China, Norway, Russia and Iceland, plus several smaller countries that environmentalists accuse of pandering to Japan to keep aid.
"You can’t really believe that Nauru or Tuvalu has an interest or has studied the sanctuary. They are voting because Japan tells them to," Jose Truda Palazzo, who spearheaded the proposal and now works at the Cetacean Conservation Center in Brazil, told the Agence France-Presse.
Japan and its allies contended that the move was simply unnecessary. The protected zone would have spanned the waters between South America and Africa south of the equator, touching the edges of an existing sanctuary in the Antarctic. If approved, it would have been the third active sanctuary created by the international commission since its founding, covering breeding grounds for all large whales in the South Atlantic. Activists argued that it would create a seamless safe zone for migrating whales.
The South Atlantic sanctuary was first suggested in 1999 but has been repeatedly blocked by whaling countries. Japan led other countries in a walkout over the proposed sanctuary last year, leaving the International Whaling Commission short of the quorum needed to even hold a vote.
Under commission rules, three-fourths of the countries represented in it had to agree to create the sanctuary. Thirty-nine voted in favor, but 21 votes against and two abstained.
The commission vote, taken at its annual meeting in Panama City, frustrated environmental groups.
Pictured: A Franca Austral whale is spotted in the New Gulf near Puerto Piramides in Argentina in 2006. Credit: Juan Mabromata / Agence France-Presse

Japan, Norway and allies vote down South Atlantic whale sanctuary

An idea raised by several South American countries to create a haven for whales in the South Atlantic was shot down Monday at the International Whaling Commission.

Though little whaling takes place in the zone, the plan was rejected by Japan, China, Norway, Russia and Iceland, plus several smaller countries that environmentalists accuse of pandering to Japan to keep aid.

"You can’t really believe that Nauru or Tuvalu has an interest or has studied the sanctuary. They are voting because Japan tells them to," Jose Truda Palazzo, who spearheaded the proposal and now works at the Cetacean Conservation Center in Brazil, told the Agence France-Presse.

Japan and its allies contended that the move was simply unnecessary. The protected zone would have spanned the waters between South America and Africa south of the equator, touching the edges of an existing sanctuary in the Antarctic. If approved, it would have been the third active sanctuary created by the international commission since its founding, covering breeding grounds for all large whales in the South Atlantic. Activists argued that it would create a seamless safe zone for migrating whales.

The South Atlantic sanctuary was first suggested in 1999 but has been repeatedly blocked by whaling countries. Japan led other countries in a walkout over the proposed sanctuary last year, leaving the International Whaling Commission short of the quorum needed to even hold a vote.

Under commission rules, three-fourths of the countries represented in it had to agree to create the sanctuary. Thirty-nine voted in favor, but 21 votes against and two abstained.

The commission vote, taken at its annual meeting in Panama City, frustrated environmental groups.

Pictured: A Franca Austral whale is spotted in the New Gulf near Puerto Piramides in Argentina in 2006. Credit: Juan Mabromata / Agence France-Presse

Filed under japan norway china russia iceland south atlantic Environment

0 notes &

Mexico axes Baja resort over environmental fears
Mexican President Felipe Calderon says he is cancelling the construction of a huge tourist resort in Baja California over concerns it could damage a nearby marine reserve.
Mr Calderon said he had withdrawn the permits from the Spanish developers.
He said developers Hansa Baja had not been able to prove the planned resort would not harm the environment.
Activists said it would have damaged the Cabo Pulmo coral reef and park, a haven for marine life.
Speaking from his official residence, President Calderon said that “because of its size we have to be absolutely certain that it wouldn’t cause irreversible damage, and that absolute certainty simply hasn’t been proved”.
Environmental battle
Mexican authorities had granted Hansa Baja initial permits to build about 30,000 hotel rooms, two golf courses and a marina near the tip of Baja California.
The 9,400-acre (3,800-hectare) project, called Cabo Cortes, caused concern among many locals and environmental groups.
The activists said it would threaten Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park, which has some of the best preserved coral reef in Mexico’s Pacific region.
The park is home to more than 200 fish species and was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 2005.
Pictured: Activists had urged politicians to save Cabo Pulmo

Mexico axes Baja resort over environmental fears

Mexican President Felipe Calderon says he is cancelling the construction of a huge tourist resort in Baja California over concerns it could damage a nearby marine reserve.

Mr Calderon said he had withdrawn the permits from the Spanish developers.

He said developers Hansa Baja had not been able to prove the planned resort would not harm the environment.

Activists said it would have damaged the Cabo Pulmo coral reef and park, a haven for marine life.

Speaking from his official residence, President Calderon said that “because of its size we have to be absolutely certain that it wouldn’t cause irreversible damage, and that absolute certainty simply hasn’t been proved”.

Environmental battle

Mexican authorities had granted Hansa Baja initial permits to build about 30,000 hotel rooms, two golf courses and a marina near the tip of Baja California.

The 9,400-acre (3,800-hectare) project, called Cabo Cortes, caused concern among many locals and environmental groups.

The activists said it would threaten Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park, which has some of the best preserved coral reef in Mexico’s Pacific region.

The park is home to more than 200 fish species and was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 2005.

Pictured: Activists had urged politicians to save Cabo Pulmo

Filed under mexico americas Environment

5 notes &

Brazil’s leader vetoes portions of new Amazon rainforest law
Dilma Rousseff sends back parts of congressional bill that loosened country’s protection of forest
Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff has partially vetoed a bill that would have weakened her country’s efforts to protect the Amazon and other forests.Environmentalists cautiously welcomed the last-minute decision, which came after the most closely watched political debate of the year in Brazil. But they warned that the battle was not yet over because large parts of the bill will still go through.Last month, legislators in both houses passed a set of revisions to the Forest Code that threatened permanent preservation areas – a key provision in Brazilian environmental legislation – that obliged farmers to keep a proportion of their land as protected forests, particularly on the fringes of rivers and hillsides. This requirement has long been opposed by Brazil’s powerful agricultural lobby.
Critics warned that the bill would reverse 20 years of struggle to protect the Amazon rainforest.
One study by São Paulo University suggested the proposed revision could would result in deforestation of an additional 22 million hectares.
WWF, Greenpeace, the Brazilian Academy of Science and the Catholic Church urged Rousseff to completely veto the bill. The global activist group, Avaaz, collected 2 million signatures opposing the legislation.With Brazil due to host the Rio+20 Earth Summit next month, approval of the bill would also have set a poor example of sustainability ahead of a conference that aims to set a new roadmap for the global environment.But the bill was popular among powerful landowners, farmers and many business people, who said it would be good for the economy to ease protection measures.Forced to choose between these diverging forces, president Rousseff compromised by using a line veto to reject 12 clauses – including an amnesty for illegal loggers - and to amend 32 others, such as a requirement for large landowners to reforest illegally cleared land.
Pictured: A deforested area of the Amazon rainforest near Novo Progresso in Brazil’s northern state of Para. Photograph: Andre Penner/AP/AP

Brazil’s leader vetoes portions of new Amazon rainforest law

Dilma Rousseff sends back parts of congressional bill that loosened country’s protection of forest

Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff has partially vetoed a bill that would have weakened her country’s efforts to protect the Amazon and other forests.

Environmentalists cautiously welcomed the last-minute decision, which came after the most closely watched political debate of the year in Brazil. But they warned that the battle was not yet over because large parts of the bill will still go through.

Last month, legislators in both houses passed a set of revisions to the Forest Code that threatened permanent preservation areas – a key provision in Brazilian environmental legislation – that obliged farmers to keep a proportion of their land as protected forests, particularly on the fringes of rivers and hillsides. This requirement has long been opposed by Brazil’s powerful agricultural lobby.

Critics warned that the bill would reverse 20 years of struggle to protect the Amazon rainforest.

One study by São Paulo University suggested the proposed revision could would result in deforestation of an additional 22 million hectares.

WWF, Greenpeace, the Brazilian Academy of Science and the Catholic Church urged Rousseff to completely veto the bill. The global activist group, Avaaz, collected 2 million signatures opposing the legislation.

With Brazil due to host the Rio+20 Earth Summit next month, approval of the bill would also have set a poor example of sustainability ahead of a conference that aims to set a new roadmap for the global environment.

But the bill was popular among powerful landowners, farmers and many business people, who said it would be good for the economy to ease protection measures.

Forced to choose between these diverging forces, president Rousseff compromised by using a line veto to reject 12 clauses – including an amnesty for illegal loggers - and to amend 32 others, such as a requirement for large landowners to reforest illegally cleared land.

Pictured: A deforested area of the Amazon rainforest near Novo Progresso in Brazil’s northern state of Para. Photograph: Andre Penner/AP/AP

Filed under brazil americas Environment Amazon Rain Forest

6 notes &

Small island states in clean energy race
Dominica leads group of 52 small island developing states aiming for a 45% cut in emissions in the next 18 years
They seldom meet on the cricket or football fields, but the world’s small island developing states are informally competing with each other to be the first to ditch fossil fuels and embrace clean energy.
A new United Nations analysis of the most recent energy plans of 52 low lying poor countries - traditionally heavily dependent on imports of petrol and oil - shows the Caribbean island of Dominica leading the world with plans to become carbon “negative” by 2020. The Maldives is not far behind, hoping to be carbon neutral by 2020. Tuvalu and the Cook islands intend to generate all their electricity from renewables by 2020 and Timor-Leste, the poorest country in Asia, expects to provide solar electricity to all its 100,000 families by 2030.
With Tonga, Samoa, Nauru, Mauritius and many other countries also volunteering to switch to solar, geothermal and wind energy, the collective target of the group of 52 small island developing states is a 45% cut in emissions in the next 18 years - considerably more than the world’s rich countries who between them have pledged 12-18% cuts by 2020.
"We are showing the world leadership," said Dominican ambassador to the UN, Vince Henderson, at a UN development programme meeting ahead of next week’s reconvened climate talks in Bonn, Germany.
"This is about survival as well as economics. We are spending $220m a year importing fuel so it is in our interests. It is vested interests by the oil, coal and fossil fuel industries that is preventing rich countries meeting their obligations. We are demanding that all countries take their responsibilities."
"Small island developing states can leap toward the goal of a poverty-free and prosperous future by changing their energy sectors," said Barbados prime minister, Freundel Stuart. "We can rally the international community with a unified voice, sharing our aspiration to become fully sustainable."
Pictured: Sunlight warms the town of Roseau. The Caribbean island of Dominica plans to become carbon ‘negative’ by 2020. Photograph: Brian Jannsen/Alamy

Small island states in clean energy race

Dominica leads group of 52 small island developing states aiming for a 45% cut in emissions in the next 18 years

They seldom meet on the cricket or football fields, but the world’s small island developing states are informally competing with each other to be the first to ditch fossil fuels and embrace clean energy.

A new United Nations analysis of the most recent energy plans of 52 low lying poor countries - traditionally heavily dependent on imports of petrol and oil - shows the Caribbean island of Dominica leading the world with plans to become carbon “negative” by 2020. The Maldives is not far behind, hoping to be carbon neutral by 2020. Tuvalu and the Cook islands intend to generate all their electricity from renewables by 2020 and Timor-Leste, the poorest country in Asia, expects to provide solar electricity to all its 100,000 families by 2030.

With Tonga, Samoa, Nauru, Mauritius and many other countries also volunteering to switch to solar, geothermal and wind energy, the collective target of the group of 52 small island developing states is a 45% cut in emissions in the next 18 years - considerably more than the world’s rich countries who between them have pledged 12-18% cuts by 2020.

"We are showing the world leadership," said Dominican ambassador to the UN, Vince Henderson, at a UN development programme meeting ahead of next week’s reconvened climate talks in Bonn, Germany.

"This is about survival as well as economics. We are spending $220m a year importing fuel so it is in our interests. It is vested interests by the oil, coal and fossil fuel industries that is preventing rich countries meeting their obligations. We are demanding that all countries take their responsibilities."

"Small island developing states can leap toward the goal of a poverty-free and prosperous future by changing their energy sectors," said Barbados prime minister, Freundel Stuart. "We can rally the international community with a unified voice, sharing our aspiration to become fully sustainable."

Pictured: Sunlight warms the town of Roseau. The Caribbean island of Dominica plans to become carbon ‘negative’ by 2020. Photograph: Brian Jannsen/Alamy

Filed under dominica americas Environment Energy sources clean energy