Escenarios Regionales

Reflecting on the world of today

Posts tagged peru

53 notes &

fotojournalismus:

Residents march against the Conga gold and silver mining project in Mamacocha Lagoon, Peru, Aug. 21, 2012. Demonstrators in Peru resumed their protests against plans to develop a $4.8 billion gold mine, saying they fear the mine will taint their water and affect a major aquifer. The mine is majority owned by U.S.-based Newmont Mining Corp.
[Credit : Martin Mejia / AP]

fotojournalismus:

Residents march against the Conga gold and silver mining project in Mamacocha Lagoon, Peru, Aug. 21, 2012. Demonstrators in Peru resumed their protests against plans to develop a $4.8 billion gold mine, saying they fear the mine will taint their water and affect a major aquifer. The mine is majority owned by U.S.-based Newmont Mining Corp.

[Credit : Martin Mejia / AP]

Filed under peru americas mining Environment protests

0 notes &

Bolivia to revoke mine licence after protests
President Evo Morales to revoke concessions of Canadian silver mine following violent opposition from Quechua Indians.
Bolivia’s president said he would revoke a mining concession from Canada’s South American Silver Corporation and give the state control of the site due to violent protests over the company’s plans.
The announcement on Wednesday is the second time in less than a month that President Evo Morales has given in to protesters’ demands for him to step up a drive to increase state control over natural resources in the poor Andean country.
Violence flared last week at South American Silver’s Malku Khota project after protesters held five Bolivian employees hostage to demand the Canadian company leave.
They hailed the president’s decision as a definitive solution to the conflict in which one protester was killed and a dozen more injured.
"The company [South American Silver] put brothers, brothers-in-law, cousins and neighbours at odds with one another," Morales said at the presidential palace as he explained the deal between protesters and his government.
"How can we be at odds with each other over an international company that comes to loot our natural resources?" said Morales, an ally of Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez, who has increased state control over the economy with a series of nationalisations.
Pictured: Bolivian president, Evo Morales, gave into protester demands regarding Canada’s South American Silver Corp [EPA]

Bolivia to revoke mine licence after protests

President Evo Morales to revoke concessions of Canadian silver mine following violent opposition from Quechua Indians.

Bolivia’s president said he would revoke a mining concession from Canada’s South American Silver Corporation and give the state control of the site due to violent protests over the company’s plans.

The announcement on Wednesday is the second time in less than a month that President Evo Morales has given in to protesters’ demands for him to step up a drive to increase state control over natural resources in the poor Andean country.

Violence flared last week at South American Silver’s Malku Khota project after protesters held five Bolivian employees hostage to demand the Canadian company leave.

They hailed the president’s decision as a definitive solution to the conflict in which one protester was killed and a dozen more injured.

"The company [South American Silver] put brothers, brothers-in-law, cousins and neighbours at odds with one another," Morales said at the presidential palace as he explained the deal between protesters and his government.

"How can we be at odds with each other over an international company that comes to loot our natural resources?" said Morales, an ally of Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez, who has increased state control over the economy with a series of nationalisations.

Pictured: Bolivian president, Evo Morales, gave into protester demands regarding Canada’s South American Silver Corp [EPA]

Filed under peru americas mining nationalizations

1 note &

Peru emergency in Cusco region over anti-mine protests
The Peruvian government has declared a state of emergency in a southern Andean province following seven days of anti-mining protests and the deaths of two demonstrators.
Freedom of assembly has been suspended and police given special powers.
More than 70 police officers have been injured in clashes with protesters in Espinar province, near Cusco.
The copper mine dispute is over pay and environment issues. The government says the move is to restore public order.
The state of emergency, which will be in force for 30 days, is the second over anti-mining protests in Ollanta Humala’s 10-month-old presidency.
Last December, civil liberties were also restricted in the northern region of Cajamarca where opposition to the construction of a huge gold mine by an American company continues.
Pictured: The dispute is over pay and environmental concerns

Peru emergency in Cusco region over anti-mine protests

The Peruvian government has declared a state of emergency in a southern Andean province following seven days of anti-mining protests and the deaths of two demonstrators.

Freedom of assembly has been suspended and police given special powers.

More than 70 police officers have been injured in clashes with protesters in Espinar province, near Cusco.

The copper mine dispute is over pay and environment issues. The government says the move is to restore public order.

The state of emergency, which will be in force for 30 days, is the second over anti-mining protests in Ollanta Humala’s 10-month-old presidency.

Last December, civil liberties were also restricted in the northern region of Cajamarca where opposition to the construction of a huge gold mine by an American company continues.

Pictured: The dispute is over pay and environmental concerns

Filed under peru americas mining protests

0 notes &

Peru issues public health alert over pelican and dolphin deaths
Peruvian government urges people to stay away from Lima’s beaches as it investigates deaths of thousands of animals
Peru’s government has declared a health alert along its northern coastline and urged residents and tourists alike to stay away from beaches, as it investigates the unexplained deaths of hundreds of dolphins and pelicans.
At least 1,200 birds, mostly pelicans, washed up dead along a stretch of Peru’s northern Pacific coastline in recent weeks, health officials said, after an estimated 800 dolphins died in the same area in recent months.
The health ministry on Saturday recommended staying away from beaches, though stopped short of a ban, and called on health officials to use gloves, masks and other protective gear when collecting dead birds.
The agriculture ministry said preliminary tests on some dead pelicans pointed to malnourishment. Oscar Dominguez, head of the ministry’s health department, said experts had ruled out bird flu.
The peak tourism season around Lima’s beaches is over, though many surfers are still venturing into the waters near the capital.
"The health ministry … calls on the population to abstain from going to the beaches until the health alert is lifted," the ministry said in a statement posted on its website, along with a photograph of a dead pelican. It added that officials had so far checked 18 beaches in and around Lima for dead birds, but gave no details on any findings. A mass pelican death along Peru’s northern coast in 1997 was blamed at the time on a shortage of feeder anchovies due to the el Niño phenomenon.
Pictured: Peru is investigating the deaths of more than 1,200 birds, mainly pelicans, as well as those of 800 dolphins along a 40-mile stretch of coastline. Photograph: Violeta Ayasta/AFP/Getty Images

Peru issues public health alert over pelican and dolphin deaths

Peruvian government urges people to stay away from Lima’s beaches as it investigates deaths of thousands of animals

Peru’s government has declared a health alert along its northern coastline and urged residents and tourists alike to stay away from beaches, as it investigates the unexplained deaths of hundreds of dolphins and pelicans.

At least 1,200 birds, mostly pelicans, washed up dead along a stretch of Peru’s northern Pacific coastline in recent weeks, health officials said, after an estimated 800 dolphins died in the same area in recent months.

The health ministry on Saturday recommended staying away from beaches, though stopped short of a ban, and called on health officials to use gloves, masks and other protective gear when collecting dead birds.

The agriculture ministry said preliminary tests on some dead pelicans pointed to malnourishment. Oscar Dominguez, head of the ministry’s health department, said experts had ruled out bird flu.

The peak tourism season around Lima’s beaches is over, though many surfers are still venturing into the waters near the capital.

"The health ministry … calls on the population to abstain from going to the beaches until the health alert is lifted," the ministry said in a statement posted on its website, along with a photograph of a dead pelican. It added that officials had so far checked 18 beaches in and around Lima for dead birds, but gave no details on any findings. A mass pelican death along Peru’s northern coast in 1997 was blamed at the time on a shortage of feeder anchovies due to the el Niño phenomenon.

Pictured: Peru is investigating the deaths of more than 1,200 birds, mainly pelicans, as well as those of 800 dolphins along a 40-mile stretch of coastline. Photograph: Violeta Ayasta/AFP/Getty Images

Filed under peru americas Environment public health

1 note &

Peru miners rescued; kidnappers hold gas-field workers
LIMA, Peru — Nine Peruvian miners trapped for six days in the collapse of a copper mine were rescued Wednesday, most walking out under their own power and wearing sunglasses against the light.
"Mission accomplished!" proclaimed President Ollanta Humala after the rescue at the mine in the southern region of Ica. Humala had flown to the zone the day before to oversee the rescue operation.
Rescuers were able to communicate with the trapped miners with a hose they lowered into the pit. It was also used to send oxygen, liquid nourishment and medicines.
The mine was not operating with proper permits, and Humala said the cave-in underscored the dangers faced by so-called informal miners. Illegal mining, said to produce as much as $2 billion in metals annually, also does terrible damage to the environment and public health, his government has said.
Wednesday’s rescue echoed the 2010 evacuation of 33 Chilean miners who had been entombed half a mile below ground for more than two months.
But as Peruvians celebrated the good news, another crisis was still playing out.
In the Andean region of Cuzco, 36 workers for gas-extracting companies have been kidnapped by guerrillas from the resurgent Shining Path group, officials from the firms said Wednesday. They have been held at least two days, and on Wednesday the government declared a 60-day state of emergency for the zone, which makes it easier for the army to deploy.
Pictured:  Peruvian President Ollanta Humala, center, waves alongside nine miners rescued in the Ica region. Credit: Cris Bouroncle / AFP/Getty Images

Peru miners rescued; kidnappers hold gas-field workers

LIMA, Peru — Nine Peruvian miners trapped for six days in the collapse of a copper mine were rescued Wednesday, most walking out under their own power and wearing sunglasses against the light.

"Mission accomplished!" proclaimed President Ollanta Humala after the rescue at the mine in the southern region of Ica. Humala had flown to the zone the day before to oversee the rescue operation.

Rescuers were able to communicate with the trapped miners with a hose they lowered into the pit. It was also used to send oxygen, liquid nourishment and medicines.

The mine was not operating with proper permits, and Humala said the cave-in underscored the dangers faced by so-called informal miners. Illegal mining, said to produce as much as $2 billion in metals annually, also does terrible damage to the environment and public health, his government has said.

Wednesday’s rescue echoed the 2010 evacuation of 33 Chilean miners who had been entombed half a mile below ground for more than two months.

But as Peruvians celebrated the good news, another crisis was still playing out.

In the Andean region of Cuzco, 36 workers for gas-extracting companies have been kidnapped by guerrillas from the resurgent Shining Path group, officials from the firms said Wednesday. They have been held at least two days, and on Wednesday the government declared a 60-day state of emergency for the zone, which makes it easier for the army to deploy.

Pictured:  Peruvian President Ollanta Humala, center, waves alongside nine miners rescued in the Ica region. Credit: Cris Bouroncle / AFP/Getty Images

Filed under peru americas mining

0 notes &

Fresh cave-in complicates effort to rescue trapped miners in Peru
A cave-in complicated work in southern Peru to rescue nine miners who have been trapped below ground for days, state media reported Sunday.
The miners have been stuck since Thursday in the wildcat Cabeza de Negro mine.
"It’s very complicated work. We’re taking into account all the necessary security measures to avoid risks among the rescuers themselves," said Cesar Chonate, a regional head of Peru’s civil defense agency, the state-run Andina news agency reported.
Video from state-run TV Peru showed workers, wearing hard hats and headlamps, loading rocks into a pushcart by hand.
It was not clear what caused the initial collapse.
The miners have been getting oxygen, food and water through a tube, which has also allowed them to stay in contact with people above ground, Andina reported.
Peru’s Cabinet chief was in the area Sunday and spoke to reporters about the ongoing effort.
"We want the rescue to happen as soon as possible, but the engineer in charge said it could be another day or two," said Oscar Valdes, according to Andina.
Peruvian Mining Minister Jorge Merino was also in the area and appealed to mining companies for their expertise, according to a statement from his office.
Mining is big business in Peru, which is a major world producer of copper, silver, gold and other minerals.
Pictured: Workers walk toward the entrance of a mine east of Ica, Peru, on Friday in an attempt to rescue nine trapped miners

Fresh cave-in complicates effort to rescue trapped miners in Peru

A cave-in complicated work in southern Peru to rescue nine miners who have been trapped below ground for days, state media reported Sunday.

The miners have been stuck since Thursday in the wildcat Cabeza de Negro mine.

"It’s very complicated work. We’re taking into account all the necessary security measures to avoid risks among the rescuers themselves," said Cesar Chonate, a regional head of Peru’s civil defense agency, the state-run Andina news agency reported.

Video from state-run TV Peru showed workers, wearing hard hats and headlamps, loading rocks into a pushcart by hand.

It was not clear what caused the initial collapse.

The miners have been getting oxygen, food and water through a tube, which has also allowed them to stay in contact with people above ground, Andina reported.

Peru’s Cabinet chief was in the area Sunday and spoke to reporters about the ongoing effort.

"We want the rescue to happen as soon as possible, but the engineer in charge said it could be another day or two," said Oscar Valdes, according to Andina.

Peruvian Mining Minister Jorge Merino was also in the area and appealed to mining companies for their expertise, according to a statement from his office.

Mining is big business in Peru, which is a major world producer of copper, silver, gold and other minerals.

Pictured: Workers walk toward the entrance of a mine east of Ica, Peru, on Friday in an attempt to rescue nine trapped miners

Filed under peru americas mining

0 notes &

Peru mining protest turns deadly in Puerto Maldonado
Three people have died and more than 30 have been injured in clashes between miners and police in Peru.
The miners are protesting against tougher penalties for illegal mining.
Local officials said police were far outnumbered by the protesters, who are trying to take control of the airport at the city of Puerto Maldonado.
The miners say the new rules will put them out of work, but the government says the sanctions will encourage miners to get the necessary permits.
An estimated 50,000 miners do not have a licence to operate.
Poisoned rivers
The government says large areas of jungle have been destroyed by illegal mining and large portions of the area’s waterways show high levels of mercury, used in the mining operations.
Officials say they want the miners to obtain the correct permits and to abide by environmental rules, but the protesters accuse the government of wanting to hand over mining concessions only to large multinational companies.
The latest protests erupted after talks between the government and the miners broke down on Tuesday.

Peru mining protest turns deadly in Puerto Maldonado

Three people have died and more than 30 have been injured in clashes between miners and police in Peru.

The miners are protesting against tougher penalties for illegal mining.

Local officials said police were far outnumbered by the protesters, who are trying to take control of the airport at the city of Puerto Maldonado.

The miners say the new rules will put them out of work, but the government says the sanctions will encourage miners to get the necessary permits.

An estimated 50,000 miners do not have a licence to operate.

Poisoned rivers

The government says large areas of jungle have been destroyed by illegal mining and large portions of the area’s waterways show high levels of mercury, used in the mining operations.

Officials say they want the miners to obtain the correct permits and to abide by environmental rules, but the protesters accuse the government of wanting to hand over mining concessions only to large multinational companies.

The latest protests erupted after talks between the government and the miners broke down on Tuesday.

Filed under peru americas mining Environment protests

2 notes &

Bolivia’s Evo Morales urges end to ban on coca chewing
Bolivian President Evo Morales has urged the UN to correct a “historic wrong” and lift a long-standing ban on the chewing of coca leaves.
Mr Morales, addressing a UN anti-drugs meeting in Vienna, said coca was part of his country’s heritage.
Coca leaves, the raw ingredient for cocaine, were declared an illegal substance under a 1961 UN convention.
Mr Morales has long called for coca to be seen as a plant of great medicinal, cultural and religious value.
Addressing the Commission on Narcotic Drugs at the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna, Mr Morales said there was no data to show that the coca leaf had an adverse effect on human beings.
Pictured: President Morales stressed what he called the beneficial uses of coca

Bolivia’s Evo Morales urges end to ban on coca chewing

Bolivian President Evo Morales has urged the UN to correct a “historic wrong” and lift a long-standing ban on the chewing of coca leaves.

Mr Morales, addressing a UN anti-drugs meeting in Vienna, said coca was part of his country’s heritage.

Coca leaves, the raw ingredient for cocaine, were declared an illegal substance under a 1961 UN convention.

Mr Morales has long called for coca to be seen as a plant of great medicinal, cultural and religious value.

Addressing the Commission on Narcotic Drugs at the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna, Mr Morales said there was no data to show that the coca leaf had an adverse effect on human beings.

Pictured: President Morales stressed what he called the beneficial uses of coca

Filed under peru americas drug war

0 notes &

After years of denying any wrongdoing, Peru has reopened investigation into forcible sterilisation of women, what human rights groups say was a crime against humanity.

During the 1990s, more than 300,000 women were pressured into being sterilised by the government.

Doctors and nurses under Alberto Fujimori’s administration, between 1996 and 2000, were assigned monthly quotas and given bonuses based on the number of sterilisations they performed.

Al Jazeera’s Latin America Editor Lucia Newman reports from Anta on the women’s quest for justice.

(Source: aljazeera.com)

Filed under peru americas human rights sterilisations

3 notes &

Leader of Peru’s leftist insurgency shot and captured in jungle
Artemio, head of Shining Path guerrilla group, wounded by security forces of president Ollanta Humala
The most important leader of Peru’s leftist Shining Path insurgency has been seriously wounded and captured by security forces after being shot in a remote jungle, president Ollanta Humala has said.
Artemio, the nom de guerre of Florindo Eleuterio Flores, heads the remnant group of guerrillas that went into the cocaine trade after the founders of the Maoist rebels were imprisoned during a bloody war against the state in the 1990s. Peru is the world’s top grower of coca, the raw ingredient for cocaine.
Humala had earlier said Artemio was dead but it was later revealed he had survived the attack.
Pictured: Artemio, the nom de guerre of Florindo Eleuterio Flores, was shot and captured by Peru’s security forces in a remote jungle. Photograph: Reuters

Leader of Peru’s leftist insurgency shot and captured in jungle

Artemio, head of Shining Path guerrilla group, wounded by security forces of president Ollanta Humala

The most important leader of Peru’s leftist Shining Path insurgency has been seriously wounded and captured by security forces after being shot in a remote jungle, president Ollanta Humala has said.

Artemio, the nom de guerre of Florindo Eleuterio Flores, heads the remnant group of guerrillas that went into the cocaine trade after the founders of the Maoist rebels were imprisoned during a bloody war against the state in the 1990s. Peru is the world’s top grower of coca, the raw ingredient for cocaine.

Humala had earlier said Artemio was dead but it was later revealed he had survived the attack.

Pictured: Artemio, the nom de guerre of Florindo Eleuterio Flores, was shot and captured by Peru’s security forces in a remote jungle. Photograph: Reuters

Filed under peru americas guerillas

0 notes &

Hundred of dead dolphins have washed up on a 66-mile stretch of coastline 500 miles north of Lima. Officials are not sure how the mammals died, but believe they may have been hunted. The Peruvian Sea Institute has taken samples to study in a laboratory. The institute also found dead anchovies in the sea, which may have poisoned the dolphins.

(Source: Guardian)

Filed under peru americas Environment